Author: Colleen Mayo

Review: Uncle Sharif’s Life in Music

Uncle Sharif’s Life in Music by Kazim Ali Review by Eric Schlich With several volumes of poetry, books of essays, novels, and works in translation under his belt, Kazim Ali seems to have done it all. The writer has few literary genres left to debut and so we are all the more fortunate to have this: his first collection of short…

Review: Anybody

Anybody by Ari Banias Review by Jayme Ringleb Anybody, Ari Banias’s debut collection, examines our invented understanding of a world we’ve codified with language and made, because of these codifications, at times less visible to ourselves and to our own understandings. So many of the collection’s poems interrogate the taxonomical and transactional erasures created by human naming, particularly as this act of…

Author Q&A: Adrian Matejka

Interview by Anna Claire Hodge Adrian Matejka was born in Nuremberg, Germany and grew up in California and Indiana. He is a graduate of Indiana University and the MFA program at Southern Illinois University Carbondale. He is the author of The Devil’s Garden (Alice James Books, 2003) which won the New York / New England Award and Mixology (Penguin, 2009), a…

Review: Isadora

Isadora by Amelia Gray Review by Daniel LoPilato   In “The Storyteller,” Walter Benjamin examines the legacy of the oral storytelling tradition and its print descendent, the novel. “The novel is significant,” he writes, “not because it presents someone else’s fate to us, but because this stranger’s fate by virtue of the flame which consumes it yields us the warmth which…

Author Q&A: Kao Kalia Yang

Interview by Misha Rai  Kao Kalia Yang is a teacher, public speaker, and writer. Yang is the author of the award-winning book, The Latehomecomer: A Hmong Family Memoir (Coffee House Press, 2008) and the book, The Song Poet (Metropolitan Books, 2016). She is a graduate of Carleton College and Columbia University’s School of the Arts. Kao Kalia lives in Minneapolis, Minnesota…

Review: Do Not Become Alarmed

Do Not Become Alarmed by Maile Meloy Review by Whitney Gilchrist A rare abstract sentence in Maile Meloy’s new novel Do Not Become Alarmed offers a way of understanding the story itself: “One aspect of human resilience, in all its marvelousness, was the ability to recalibrate, to adjust to new circumstances with astonishing speed.” The story embeds this reflection on “recalibrat[ion]”…

Review: Contradictions in the Design

Contradictions in the Design by Matthew Olzmann Review by Ray Barker The thirty-seven poems in Matthew Olzmann’s recent collection, Contradictions in the Design, strive to find meaning and value in personal experiences as viewed through a historical lens. With an endless reserve of curiosity, Olzmann surveys a range of places and objects, questioning their significance as clues to deeper truths. Museums figure…

Author Q&A: Jordan Flaherty

Interview by Dyan Neary Jordan Flaherty is an award-winning journalist, producer, and author. He has appeared as a guest on a wide range of television and radio shows, including CNN Morning, Anderson Cooper 360, CNN Headline News, RT America, the Alan Colmes Show on Fox, and News and Notes on NPR. He is the author of the books No More…

Author Q&A: A.A. Balaskovits

Interview by Misha Rai Originally from the Chicagoland area, A.A. Balaskovits has lived all across the American Midwest but currently calls South Carolina her home. She received her B.A. from Loras College, her MFA from Bowling Green State University and her Ph.D. from The University of Missouri.She has served as an Assistant Fiction Editor for The Mid American Review and…

Review: Lincoln in the Bardo

Lincoln in the Bardo by George Saunders Review by Theodore Yurevitch I didn’t know what a bardo was before reading George Saunders’s new novel Lincoln in the Bardo, and I can’t say I was sure afterward, either. I knew Saunders’s work, though, as many do; he’s the author of several acclaimed collections of short stories, novellas, and essays. Not long ago, one of…