Author: Emily Faison

Craft Talk: Kerry James Evans

POETRY BOOTCAMP 1. First off, poems aren’t magical things that plop from the air and onto your plate, fat and greasy like Grandmother’s dumplings. It might happen, but I wouldn’t count on it. 2. Be open for the unexpected, but be so with purpose. If something comes up, don’t think about how you can turn the adventure into a poem; rather, be…

Author Q&A: Jesse Goolsby

Interview by Kelsey Satalino Jesse Goolsby is an Air Force officer and the author of the novel I’d Walk with My Friends If I Could Find Them (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt). His fiction and essays have appeared widely, to include Narrative Magazine, Epoch, The Literary Review, Salon, Alaska Quarterly Review, The Greensboro Review, and Redivider. He is the recipient of the…

Craft Talk: Sandra Simonds

EXERCISE IN NEGATIVE METAPHOR There is no such thing as a poem without imagination. There are poems without metaphors that can work, poems without similes that can work, poems that don’t use rhyme or rhythm that can work and work well, but a poem without imagination isn’t a poem. The imagination is the cornerstone of all great poetry. Period. No…

Craft Talk: Catherine Staples

SCHOOLING FIGURES It’s a very good thing to have poems you admire rattling round in your head. They are schooling figures for the mind and good company, sometimes providing inspiration and, other times, solace. With the mention of just two words, “slumber” and “diurnal,” most poets will recall Wordsworth’s “Lucy poems”–if not the entire string of five mysterious poems written…

Craft Talk: Geoff Wyss

NOTES TO SELF I don’t like to write about writing. Stepping outside of my writing makes it hard to get back in, like kissing might be after a discussion about kissing. And I never know why someone would want to hear what I have to say about writing (or kissing). So the remarks below are addressed to the very specific…

Author Q&A: Jamie Quatro

Interview by Jeremy Tow Jamie Quatro’s debut collection, I Want To Show You More (Grove) is a New York Times Notable Book, NPR Best Book of 2013 and New York Times Editors’ Choice. Quatro’s fiction, poetry, and essays have appeared in Tin House, Ploughshares, The Kenyon Review, McSweeney’s, Oxford American, The New York Times Book Review, and elsewhere. Her stories…

Author Q&A: Sarah Blake

Interview by Anna Claire Hodge Sarah Blake lives outside of Philadelphia, PA with her husband and son. Her poems have appeared, or will soon, in The Kenyon Review, The Los Angeles Review of Books, and the anthology, The BreakBeat Poets. She received a grant from the National Endowment of the Arts in 2013. Her first book of poetry, Mr. West,…

Review: Between Wrecks

Between Wrecks, by George Singleton Review by Hector Mojena   In George Singleton’s Between Wrecks, the South is as much a physical space as it is an ever-present theme. A psycho-geography rich in images of familial implosion, dead-end jobs, and the always searing heat is mapped out in Singleton’s prose, embracing the decaying south in all its dark and surreal…

Author Q&A: Rob Talbert

Interview by Ashley Hart Rob Talbert was born and raised in San Antonio, the home he’s forever running away from. His poems have appeared or are forthcoming in Alaska Quarterly, American Poetry Review, Ninth Letter, Painted Bride Quarterly, Passages North, Rattle and others. His first book of poems, Jagged Tune, is available from MadHat Press. Currently, he is working on…

Review: War of the Foxes

The War of the Foxes, by Richard Siken Review by William Fargason     After the success of his first book of poetry, Crush, which won the Yale Series of Younger Poets prize in 2004, Richard Siken stayed quiet. He waited ten years before releasing his second book War of the Foxes in 2015. Now that we have his second…