Category: Reviews

Review: WHELM

WHELM, a poetry collection by dawn lonsinger, Lost Horse Press Reviewed by Sandra Simonds Whelm by dawn lonsinger is a book of poems dominated by the forces of water where water is made mysterious, terrifying and strange. The book is a kind of cataloging of water’s various powers both symbolically and materially. Her primary concern is the world flooded and…

Review: On the Street of Divine Love

On the Street of Divine Love: New and Selected Poems, a poetry collection by Barbara Hamby, University of Pittsburgh Press, Reviewed by Sandra Simonds Barbara Hamby’s On the Street of Divine Love: New and Selected Poems is a collection full of poems that tell word-crazy, meandering and charming stories. In Hamby’s best poems, the reader begins one place and ends…

Review: Claire of the Sea Light

Claire of the Sea Light, a novel by Edwidge Danticat, Random House, Reviewed by Esther Spencer Claire of the Sea Light, Edwidge Danticat’s fifth novel, takes readers on a journey into the island of Haiti. Danticat, once again, shares Haitian culture and history and provides an intimate glimpse into the way of life of the people. The characters she creates…

Review: Once Upon A River

A novel by Bonnie Jo Campbell, Once Upon A River, W.W. Norton & Company. Review by Forrest Anderson Toward the end of Once Upon a River, a farmer negotiating a crop-damage hunting permit with the novel’s protagonist, Margo Crane, tells her he has heard she’s a “regular sharpshooter” and “some kind of throwback.” Margo, forced to navigate life on her…

Review: Rise

Stories by L. Annette Binder, Sarabande Books Reviewed by Matt Dauphin Obsession, pain, and longing. These are the elements that indelibly mark L. Annette Binder’s short story collection, Rise. Though it is billed as reworked fairy tales whose characters exist “at the fringes of everyday life,” Rise doesn’t really enter the realm of fairy tale. Actually, approaching the book from…

Review: A River So Long

A River So Long by Vallie Lynn Watson review by Micah Dean Hicks Veronica, the protagonist of Watson’s A River So Long, lives in a world of hotels. Her job takes her to Phoenix, Indianapolis, New Orleans, all over the country. Friends and lovers come and go, but Veronica ends up alone, standing in front of a window high over the city,…

Review: The World Without You

A novel by Josh Henkin, The World Without You, Vintage Reviewed by Adam Blackman The World Without You by Josh Henkin, newly released in paperback, tells the story of a family splintered by the loss of a loved one in Iraq. It is a novel primarily focused on family.  Fourth of July sits in the backdrop as the Frankel family…

Review: A Dying Fall

A Dying Fall, A novel by Elly Griffiths, Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Reviewed by Misha Rai Murder with its usual dash of mayhem, bleak British landscape, university politics, Druid networks, toddlers, complicated love triangles, and the Raven King (what archaeological murder mystery would be complete without the King?) all make their deliciously nefarious presence felt in Elly Griffiths’ A Dying Fall.…

Review: The Alligator’s Bleached Grin: the Grotesque as Eden in Anna Journey’s Vulgar Remedies

Poetry by Anna Journey, Vulgar Remedies Louisiana State University Press Reviewed by Kara Candito In “Eden and My Generation,” Larry Levis claims that the poet realizes the spirituality of place through loss and absence. “Eden,” he states, “becomes truly valuable only after a fall, after an exile that changes it, irrecoverably, from what it once was.” According to Levis, the…