Category: Reviews

Review: Stealing History

Essays by Gerald Stern, Stealing History. Trinity University Press review by  W. M. Lobko Gerald Stern on the former U.S. general Stanley McChrystal: “…he was and is rebellious violent brilliant cocky insubordinate focused a braggart a patriot, and, as the head of Special Operations and as a commander in the Rangers, a specialized killer”. On the similarity between Babylon, Hell,…

Review: Animal Eye

Poetry by Paisley Rekdal,  Animal Eye University of Georgia Press Reviewed by W.M. Lobko Paisley Rekdal opens her fourth book of poetry with the following salvo: “And then I thought, Can I have more / of this, would it be possible / for every day to be a greater awakening, more light / more light…” This is a limber, confident…

Review: Eudora Welty, Whiteness, and Race

Eudora Welty, Whiteness, and Race Edited by Harriet Pollack, University of Georgia Press Reviewed by Patrick Osborne Over the last few decades, literary critics have struggled to interpret Eudora Welty’s treatment of race in her collected works and, for the most part, speculate that she was either blind or ambivalent to racism during her lifetime. Harriet Pollack’s Eudora Welty, Whiteness,…

Review, The Man Who Noticed Everything by Adrian Van Young

Stories by Adrian Van Young, The Man Who Noticed Everything, Black Lawrence Press Reviewed by Keith McCleary “Hard Water,” the opening story in Adrian Van Young’s debut collection, begins uneasily in a strange valley of intersecting narrative tropes. A curmudgeonly rancher is visited one spring by a young drifter looking for work. The rancher, hardened and misanthropic, is more interested…

Review: Kings of the F**king Sea / Dan Boehl & Jonathan Marshall

Poetry by Dan Boehl, art by Jonathan Marshall. Kings of the F**king Sea. Birds, LLC. 2011. Reviewed by David Moody On a shelf, Kings of the F**king Sea by Dan Boehl looks like many other poetry books. Thin and softbound, its shape cries “Poems! A poem collection! Loosely bound by theme, maybe a voice!” Yet Kings is not a mere collection. It is an avant-garde…

Review: Nostalgia for the Criminal Past / Kathleen Winter

Kathleen Winter. Nostalgia for the Criminal Past. Elixir Press. 2011. Reviewed by April Manteris From the opening, title poem in her debut collection, Nostalgia for the Criminal Past, Kathleen Winter seems to revel in the past, for a time when “Like the children, we were naked,” longing for the kind of innocence wherein “We let our hair grow wild, we never paid taxes,” and we drowned in…

Review: Madame X / Darcie Dennigan

Darcie Dennigan. Madame X. Canarium Books, 2012. Reviewed by Anna Claire Hodge Darcie Dennigan’s poems are all over the place, or rather, all over the page. In just flipping through Madame X, one might be daunted by the flurry of form, the constant ebb and flow of lines from page-long blocks of text divided only by ellipses, or mid-length lines surrounded by white space.…

Review: Windeye / Brian Evenson

Brian Evenson. Windeye. Coffee House Press, 2012. Reviewed by Micah Dean Hicks Brian Evenson’s latest collection, Windeye, is a book that will ruin you. Between stories, you’ll get up to lock the door, look out your window, stare into dark corners. At the end of the collection, you’ll be dizzy, coughing, paranoid. You’ll be sure that you are “dim, lost, and, though with us,…

Review: Wild / Cheryl Strayed

Cheryl Strayed. Wild: From Lost to Found on the Pacific Crest Trail. Knopf. 2012. Reviewed by Paul Haney Cheryl Strayed’s new memoir, Wild: From Lost to Found on the Pacific Crest Trail, is about a 26-year-old woman coming to terms with the hardships of her life by retreating for two months to hike the Pacific Crest Trail. This retreat, however, is no…