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Review, The Man Who Noticed Everything by Adrian Van Young

Stories by Adrian Van Young, The Man Who Noticed Everything, Black Lawrence Press Reviewed by Keith McCleary “Hard Water,” the opening story in Adrian Van Young’s debut collection, begins uneasily in a strange valley of intersecting narrative tropes. A curmudgeonly rancher is visited one spring by a young drifter looking for work. The rancher, hardened and misanthropic, is more interested…

Tarfia Faizullah

Interviewed by Anna Claire Hodge Tarfia Faizullah is the author of Seam (Southern Illinois University Press, 2014), winner of the 2012 Crab Orchard Series in Poetry First Book Award. Her poems appear in Ploughshares, The Missouri Review, The Southern Review, Massachusetts Review, Ninth Letter, and other journals, and are anthologized in Poems of Devotion: An Anthology of Recent Poets (Wipf…

Kimberly L. Wright

Winter 2012 Writing Regimen Contest Winner At the end of every month-long writing regimen, participants are invited to submit up to three of their best regimen-inspired pieces for a chance at publication in SER Online. After sifting through the many excellent submissions from this winter’s run, we managed to select just one poem to display. We are proud to announce that Kimberly L. Wright is…

Julie Marie Wade

BONEFrom The Southeast Review Volume 30.1         I always had “good bones,” the doctor said, tapping my knee with his tiny hammer. “Fine bone structure,” it was clear to see, like my mother, who—by her own estimation—was still beautiful despite her large bones. “But women like us,” she said. “We have to work a little harder.”           Women like us. I swallowed the…

A. E. Loveridge

BLUES (AND BENJAMIN) From The Southeast Review Volume 30.1Very soon, the windows will shutter against August’s hurricanes,but until then, swing them wide like a curveball pitch. Pour me a bourbon and sing me the saddest song,one that a woman taught you about regretting a man, with a tenor saxophone in the chorus, a baritone voicelike the nightfall trains, the geese returning to…

David Crews

SILENCE From The Southeast Review Volume 30.1It was around the time I found the little girl,and then started having dreams of my mother. When we fought she sometimes came to my bed,tried to apologize, as I stared at the dark beige wall pretending to sleep. It felt like a thousand severed treespiled onto a frail body, branches scratching eyes. And since I…

Joshua L. Ruffin

THE GREAT SILENCE From The Southeast Review Volume 30.1They like to pretend The Good, the Bad,and the Ugly is a spaghetti western.Sure, the ingredients are there: the villain whom we know by his shoe-polish-blackmustache, the hero who’d just as soonmake love to you—with his gunbelt onif you asked—as light a cigar on your smoldering eye socket. Mostimportant: Morricone panning whistlesleft to right,…

Kim Henderson

A BROOKSIDE PARK SUNBURNFrom The Southeast Review Volume 30.1Winner of SER‘s 2011 World’s Best Short-Short Story Contest          We were thirteen and it was the summer of ugliness. Bony feet, rough and black-green on bottom, concave chests and taut lower bellies—still not quite women, lips chewed and chapped, ratty chlorine-bleached hair on end—no mothers around to fix it, every inch of our ugly…

Susan Bulloch

Fall 2012 Writing Regimen Contest Winner At the end of every month-long writing regimen, participants are invited to submit up to three of their best regimen-inspired pieces for a chance at publication in SER Online. After sifting through the varied and truly wonderful submissions from this summer’s run, we managed to select just one essay to display. We are proud to announce that Susan…

Interview: Caitlin Horrocks

Interviewed by Katie Cortese Caitlin Horrocks is author of the story collection This Is Not Your City, which was named a New York Times Book Review Editor’s Choice, a Barnes and Noble Discover Great New Writers selection, and one of the best books of 2011 by the San Francisco Chronicle. Her stories appear in The New Yorker, The Best American Short Stories,…